Where Can You Live In An RV? All-State Laws

 

Some people (especially those who have never lived in one) think that living the RV life is a bit of an adventure. Others view it as being too close to homelessness or living off the grid. However, there are many reasons why you might want to live in an RV and these vary from person to person. For some, it could be because they’re retired and just don’t want the responsibility of maintaining a house anymore. For others, it may be so they can travel more often without having all their belongings with them at all times like when you rent a hotel room for example.

No matter what your reason for wanting to live in an RV is though since laws differ by the state on where RVs can be parked overnight or even for longer periods of time, it’s important to know the rules before setting up shop in your new home on wheels.

The first thing that you’ll need to do is research the laws of the states that you’ll be travelling through. Some states allow people to live in their RV on public land for a certain number of days, while others have stricter laws. It’s important to know what the laws are so that you don’t get into any trouble.

Here are the all-state laws for living in an RV:

Alabama

There is no law that expressly forbids overnight camping in an RV on public property. However, there are laws that restrict camping on state parks and beaches (camping is only allowed in designated areas). Additionally, local ordinances may prohibit or restrict camping in certain areas so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Alaska

Overnight stay in RVs is allowed on most public lands managed by the Bureau of Land Management (BLM), National Park Service (NPS), and US Forest Service (USFS). However, there are some areas where camping is not allowed such as near water bodies, in developed recreation sites, or in ways that would damage the environment. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas).

Arizona

Overnight camping in an RV is generally allowed on public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Arkansas

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM, USFS, and the US Army Corps of Engineers. However, there are some areas where camping is not allowed such as near water bodies, in developed recreation sites, or in ways that would damage the environment. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas).

California

Overnight camping in an RV is generally allowed on public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Colorado

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Connecticut

There is no law that expressly forbids overnight camping in an RV on public property. However, there are laws that restrict camping on state parks and beaches (camping is only allowed in designated areas). Additionally, local ordinances may prohibit or restrict camping in certain areas so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Delaware

There is no law that expressly forbids overnight camping in an RV on public property. However, there are laws that restrict camping on state parks and beaches (camping is only allowed in designated areas). Additionally, local ordinances may prohibit or restrict camping in certain areas so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Florida

Overnight camping in an RV is generally allowed on public lands managed by the BLM, USFS, and the US Army Corps of Engineers. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Georgia

Overnight camping in an RV is generally allowed on public lands managed by the BLM, USFS, and the US Army Corps of Engineers. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Hawaii

There is no law that expressly forbids overnight camping in an RV on public property. However, there are laws that restrict camping on state parks and beaches (camping is only allowed in designated areas). Additionally, local ordinances may prohibit or restrict camping in certain areas so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Idaho

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Illinois

There is no law that expressly forbids overnight camping in an RV on public property. However, there are laws that restrict camping on state parks and beaches (camping is only allowed in designated areas). Additionally, local ordinances may prohibit or restrict camping in certain areas so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Indiana

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Iowa

Overnight camping in an RV is generally allowed on public lands managed by the BLM, USFS, and the US Army Corps of Engineers. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Kansas

Overnight camping in an RV is generally allowed on public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Kentucky

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Louisiana

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Maine

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Maryland

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Massachusetts

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Michigan

Overnight in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

Minnesota

Overnight camping in an RV is allowed on most public lands managed by the BLM and USFS. However, there are some restrictions in place such as not being able to camp within 100 feet of a water source, road, or trail. Additionally, most state parks do not allow overnight camping in RVs (with the exception of a few that have designated RV camping areas). Some cities also have ordinances against camping in RVs so it’s always best to check with the local authorities before setting up camp.

While there are many places in the United States where you can live in an RV full time, each state has its own laws governing RVs. In some states, like Texas, it’s legal to live in your RV on a property that you own. Other states, like California, have more restrictive laws and require that RVs be parked in designated camping areas.

To find out the laws in your state, the best resource is the website of the National Association of RV Parks and Campgrounds (NARVC). On their website, they have a comprehensive list of state laws governing RVs.

Warwick Braith

Warwick Braith is a thrill seeker at heart. He loves getting outdoors and testing his limits in the wild. As a blogger for YapQ, Warwick provides readers with insights and tips on how to get the most out of their outdoor experiences. Whether it's hiking, camping, or simply exploring nature, Warwick knows how to make the most of it.

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